Goodnight Moon by Margaret Wise Brown

Standard

Goodnight Moon is a classic that is often read to children by their parents before bed because it involves saying goodnight to many things. Saying goodnight is a common social practice so reading a book about saying goodnight to the things that a child might be able to see and hear before falling asleep is very appropriate. It could also be used at naptime in a classroom as a way to calm children and prepare them for naptime.

Goodnight Moon has many good elements that can help develop children’s language. There are many rhymes such as kittens and mittens and bears and chairs. The illustrations are basic enough that the objects discussed can be easily seen and identified. Children could have fun spotting the things being told goodnight to make the story more interactive. It also does a nice job of providing solitary pictures of different things such as after saying “goodnight moon,” there is a picture of the moon which could help children to associate the word and the object and build vocabulary knowledge.

It is interesting how every other double page spread is colorful and the next double page spread is in black and white. The color pages are of the whole room whereas the black and white pictures are of the individual things that are being said goodnight to. The illustrations portray light and the passing of time well. As the story continues, the shades of color become darker yet the light from the stars, moon, fire, and dollhouse shine brightly.


Goodnight Moon is also available in Spanish and other languages so it can be used well in classroom which include English Language Learners. Other versions, Goodnight Moon 1, 2, 3 and Goodnight Moon A, B, C, could be used as a learning extension to this easy-to-read bedtime story.

Reviewed by Bryanna Jew and Olivia Calandro

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s