Category Archives: New Releases

La La La

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Described as a story of hope, La La La by Kate DiCamillo is a nearly wordless picture book that captures the emotions of the process of finding a friend. Jaime Kim’s illustrations use bright colors, incredible detail, and soft features to bring this story to life.

L 2This story follows a little girl’s journey as she explores the world in search of companionship. Everywhere she goes she sings out in the hopes of hearing a response from someone, anyone. Beginning with a daytime world the little girl explores and sings out, but hears no response. As she becomes frustrated she gives up until she sees that the world has changed. It is now nighttime and she decides to venture out again into the world in search of a friend.

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L 4Upon her discovery of the moon, she becomes incredibly hopeful that she has found a companion, but when the moon does not respond to any of her singing she decides to try and get closer. Climbing a ladder up into the sky, she calls with all her might to the moon but receives no answer. Truly defeated, she returns to her lonely, bland world. Eventually the little girl falls asleep, only to be awoken by a strong voice singing out. Her world is light up by a beam of light coming from the source of the singing.

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The little girl finds the rising sun beaming down at her. Finally, the girl’s call of “La” is heard by someone and responded to with an enthusiastic “LA! LA!”. Having found each other and successfully bonded to create a true friendship, the story ends with the rising sun and the little girl singing a beautiful song together.

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The author and illustrator notes at the end of the book discuss the creation of this story as simple designs that became a representation of human experiences. DiCamillo says that the message of the book is to remember that “even if we are small and alone and afraid, if we sing, sometimes someone answers back”. Kim’s note about the process of illustrating this story talks about her personal experiences as a little girl and trying to capture the feelings of loneliness, searching for a friend, and the overwhelming relief and love that comes with finally finding someone. This beautiful and delicate story of the search for friendship tells an incredibly relatable tale through mesmerizing illustrations that leave the reader with a powerful feeling of hope.

 

Josie Mark

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I Just Want To Say Good Night

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I Just Want To Say Good Night

This colorful and entertaining picture book is a perfect bedtime story for all ages.  I Just Want To Say Goodnight incorporates the universal story of a child procrastinating their bedtime through a multicultural lens.  The bright and vibrant colors of the illustrations capture the setting in the African village beautifully, while demonstrating sentiment and emotion through the characters as well.  In addition, this book is notably a Caldecott Honor winner.

The book begins with the young girl Lala greeting her father and asking about his day.  The illustrations use the coloring of the sky to indicate that the sun is setting and it is almost the end of the day.  When Lala’s father tells her it is time for bed, she explains that she wants to say good night to a few animals in the village.  She says good night to the fish, the cat, the ants, etc.

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My favorite illustration throughout the book is the double page spread where Lala is saying good night to the monkey.  She kindly bends down to the little monkey’s level and offers him a flower.  The illustration is set with a bright pink and purple sky, and the sun close to the horizon.

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The concept of time passing, and night-time approaching, is wonderfully represented through the illustrations.  As the reader delves deeper into the story, the illustrated sky goes from sunset, to dusk, and then night.  Not only does the sky get darker, but the lighting and contrast in the rest of the illustration develops too.  Lala becomes more of a silhouette as the sky darkens, and shadows begin to appear.

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As time goes on, Lala has difficulty finding anything left to say good night too.  She finally says good nigh to a rock before following her Mama into the house.  Once in bed, she grabs her bed time book, in which the illustration and text both allude to the famous, and classic, bed time board book, Goodnight Moon by Margaret Wise Brown.

Author and Illustrator, Rachel Isadora is well-known for her wonderful children’s books in which she seamlessly incorporates playful and relatable stories in African settings and backgrounds.  She truly does a remarkable job of creating books with multicultural themes that children of all ages and ethnicities can thoroughly enjoy.  I absolutely loved this book, for its child-like humor and magnificent pictures, and would recommend it to any parent, family member, or caretaker that is looking for a fun and new book to read during bed time.

 

Casey Quinn

The People Shall Continue/ El Pueblo Seguirá

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The People Shall Continue is a story that tells the history and plights of the indigenous people of America. It was written by Simon J. Ortiz who is a part of the Acoma Pueblo Tribe, and illustrated by Sharol Graves. Originally published in 1977, for its 40th anniversary they republished this special edition in both English and Spanish.

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Told from a third-person perspective, the book begins with how the world came to be. Many years ago, everything was created, and the People were also born. Some say that the People came from many different places, and they went to live in the North, South, East, and West. They had all different jobs, from fishermen to artisans. They were healers and leaders, and they all agreed to take care of the Earth which is the source of all life.            Screen Shot 2017-10-30 at 1.28.39 PM.png

The People, which is how the indigenous people refer to themselves, would visit each other’s lands, and when arguments took place their leaders would remind them that they had to respect one another. Life was hard for them, and when famines or droughts would take place they reminded themselves that they could not take anything for granted and in order to continue, they had to struggle hard for life.            Screen Shot 2017-10-30 at 1.29.30 PM.png

One day something strange started to happen. Men came on the oceans to the Western Coasts. They were strange red-haired men, and they did not stay long. The People then began to hear fearful stories of these strange Spanish men who caused destruction amongst the People. More and more white people came and made treaties with the People to stop their armed fight. The People agreed to live on reservations which had poor land and not much to hunt.          Screen Shot 2017-10-30 at 1.28.31 PM.png

Soon more Americans came and wanted to take the land that the People lived on and change the way that the People lived. They took the children from their families and sent them to schools that were far away. They moved the people into cities across the US, and all the while the People remembered who they were.          Screen Shot 2017-10-30 at 1.29.16 PM

The People looked around them and saw people of all different races and ethnicities being kept down by American power. They realized that they had to share their history with these people as well. They shared their struggles and that they shall continue.

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This book is colorful and weaves the intricate story of the plight of indigenous people in a way that is easily accessible to children without sugar-coating the struggles that they faced.

Jamie Williams

Schomburg: The Man Who Built a Library

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Schomburg: The Man Who Built a Library by Carole Boston Weatherford, illustrated by Eric Velasquez, tells the story of Arturo Schomburg, a black man living in the Harlem Renaissance. Schomburg collected books, music, art, and other works from Africa and people of African descent to bring to light these often forgotten historical documents and figures. The book follows Arturo’s life from a young black boy in Puerto Rico, curious about the contributions his ancestors made to history, through his journey to New York, and his years of researching and collecting the artifacts of “Africa’s sons and daughters.” When his collection became too big for him to keep, he sold it to the New York Public Library, where it soon became the “cornerstone of the Division of Negro History, Literature and Prints.” Arturo Schomburg left a legacy that lives on today; his work has acted as a beacon for scholars all over the world. Through the use of poetry with titles reflecting both the different chapters of Schomburg’s life and the many black historical figures whose work he collected, as well as amazingly realistic illustrations, Schomburg beautifully captures the essence of a man who was always busy working to make sure that his people had their rightful place in history. Written for an older elementary school audience, the book also extends the prime picture book age to include these older children.

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Schomburg gives readers short biographies of many black historical figures, some of whom are well-known today for their contributions to the history of our country. However, while many of these men and women have become household names, their full stories often go untold. The book attempts to bring light to some of the lesser-known aspects of their lives.

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In addition to giving readers more details about many already well-known black historical figures, Schomburg also features many “whitewashed” historical figures: those who were descended from slaves or of African descent but whose ties to Africa are left out of popular history.

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The book ends by returning to focus on the life and legacy of Schomburg himself. As written in the final poem of the book, “Epitaph: 1938”: “There was no field of human endeavor / that he did not till with his determined hand… / or that he did not water with a growing sense / of African heritage and awareness.”

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This book is sorely needed in the world of children’s literature, because it features not only a wide range of black historical figures and those with African heritage, but also the man who made sure that these men and women had their rightful place in history. This book should be read in all schools to ensure that the youth of today get to know this incredible man, and that they can feel the pride of seeing themselves represented in history.

Maya Creamer

Bird, Balloon, Bear

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Bird, Balloon, Bear is a story about finding the courage to make a friend written and illustrated by Il Sung Na.

It starts out with Bird moving to a new forest and meet Bear. Wanting to be his friend Bird pushes through his shyness and musters up the courage to talk to Bear but it’s too late, he already has another friend.

Distraught Bird watches on as Bear and Balloon have lots of fun while they play, dance, and watch the sunset together.

Everything seems to be going well until one day the wind is blowing especially hard and blows Balloon away. Bird leaps into action and flies as hard and fast as he can catch the balloon, but it’s too late.

Bear and Bird look on at what is left of Balloon, and Bear finally introduces himself to Bird, and Bird now has the courage to introduce himself back. After that, they play, dance, and watch the sunset together.

This story is a light-hearted way to help kids address shyness when it comes to making new friends. By watching Bird work through his shyness children can see that it is not hard to talk to and make new friends.

 

Jamie Williams

 

His Royal Highness, King Baby: A Terrible True Story

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His Royal Highness, King Baby by Sally Lloyd-Jones and illustrated by David Roberts is a royal twist on the classic tale of sibling jealousy. The main character, the sister, imagines herself as “the most beautifulest, cleverest, ever-so-kindest Princess with long, flowing wondrous hair,” whose ENTIRE LIFE is ruined by the birth of her baby brother, His Royal Highness, King Baby. The sister complains that the baby takes all of her parents’ time as they celebrate each of his ridiculous milestones. The innocent sister is (in her words) left to completely fend for herself, even though the illustrations don’t quite back up her dramatic viewpoint. The baby is constantly shown as an angelic, pudgy figure surrounded by unicorns and rainbows. The sister glares from the background, her jealousy apparent throughout the text. The illustrations include the Princess’ doodles, which depict her little brother in the way that she sees him – an annoying, smelly monster. For his first birthday, the entire family pours in to celebrate, leaving the Princess alone. She finally plans to dress up as a fairy and break the spell of King Baby. However, just as she enters his palace, he starts crying inconsolably. After everyone else in the family gives up on comforting him, she is able to quiet her brother immediately. They finally bond, and the Princess includes King Baby in all of her royal decrees and adventures. She still sees herself as Princess Big Sister at the conclusion of the book, but she’s definitively okay with having a brother.

My favorite part of this story is that the sister does not have to give up her princess identity in order to accept her brother. Instead, she includes him in her royal escapades. I think this is a good lesson for children that may have trouble adjusting to a new sibling. It shows that they don’t have to change themselves in order to be similar to, or stand out from, the new baby. They will be loved and appreciated regardless. The illustrations in this book highlight several interesting perspectives. The mother is drawn much like a queen, with a fancy dress and curly hair, while the father is typically shown in normal, casual clothing. I think this reflects the mother’s role as Queen of the Household and mother of the royal sister and brother. Additionally, the mismatch between the sister’s drawings/narrative and the illustrations is a fascinating difference to point out to readers. While the sister claims that she is left to make her own breakfast, the illustration shows her being handed a plate of eggs and fruit. Later on in the book, her drawing of the breakfast scenario appears. She is crying, holding a plate with a single egg that she supposedly was forced to make by herself. A cute detail throughout the story is the sister’s pet gerbil, who appears on most pages. This element contrasts the lavish royal lifestyle with the normalcy of having a pet like a gerbil. This mix of moods makes the illustrations more complex and visually appealing. Overall, I would recommend this book to any parent whose child is having trouble adjusting after the birth of a new baby.

Maddie Geller

Marvelous New Picture Books: School’s First Day of School

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School’s First Day of School by Adam Rex, illustrated by Christian Robinson, is exactly what it sounds like: the story of the first day of school, from the perspective of the school himself. In the story, Frederick Douglass Elementary is nervous for the first day of school, when he will be filled with children. Janitor assures him he’ll like them, but the school isn’t so sure. Although at first the school really doesn’t like the children, by the end of the day he learns lots of new things and decides that maybe they aren’t so bad. He starts to love being a school, and can’t wait for the kids to return the next day.

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The story begins with the construction of the school, Frederick Douglass Elementary. The school likes his name, and he likes when Janitor comes to clean him up. But he’s nervous to be filled with children.

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When the children arrive, the school feels overwhelmed. They climb all over his playground, open all his doors and lockers, and some even say mean things about him. The school feels awful about himself, because the children don’t like him; one little girl doesn’t even want to come in his front doors.

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The school listens to one of his kindergarten classes and learns all their names as they start the day. But just as they start to settle in, his fire alarm goes off. At lunch, a kid tells a joke that makes his friend squirt nose milk all over the school’s table. The joke was pretty funny, so the school isn’t really mad.

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For the rest of the day, the school listens in on the kindergarten class, and learns lots of new things. He feels great when the teacher hangs up a little girl’s picture of him on his wall. By the time the children leave, the school can’t wait to tell Janitor all about his day. He even asks Janitor if the kids can come back tomorrow. The school has finally learned to love being what he is; he knows he’s pretty lucky to get to be a school.

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I think this book is incredibly cute, and a great variation on the first day of kindergarten books that many of us read as young children. It would be great book to read to a child who is nervous or expressing doubts about the first day of school; because the main character is the school rather than a kid, it shows that the first day of school can be fun and exciting without making the lesson too obvious. Also, the unusual main character makes the book novel for kids, and makes them relate their own feelings about school to both the feelings of their classmates and the potential feelings of the school itself. Who knows, maybe their elementary school is thinking and feeling the same things as the school in the book!

This book has a good mix of words that kids will know and new words. This gives the parent/teacher an opportunity to discuss the unfamiliar words with kids, and really engage them in the reading of the book. This book could also be used as a way to introduce some of the school-related words that children may need to know before they start school for the first time, such as lockers, water fountain, and fire alarm. By introducing these words in the context of a school setting, the book helps children to connect the words and their meanings.

Finally, I love the simplicity of the illustrations in this book. They were made using paint and collage techniques, which gives them a rough, child-like appearance. They almost look as if a child created them. However, although they are simple, the illustrations show the diversity of the students at the school, as well as the variety of activities they engage in throughout the school day. The bright images are engaging and fun to look at, but don’t draw too much focus away from the text of the story. Also, setting the images against a white background really makes them stand out.

I love School’s First Day of School, and I think it would be a great book to read to any child about to enter school for the first time. It truly is a marvelous new picture book!

by Maya Creamer